Posts with the label photography
Showing posts with label photography. Show all posts
Showing posts with label photography. Show all posts

January 14, 2022

American Labor Museum and the Pietro and Maria Botto House | Haledon, New Jersey

Strike meeting at the Botto House 1913 by Mike Conner.
 

Home of the American Labor Museum

 

New Jersey was the home of many silk mills during the last century. 

 

It is now the home of the American Labor Museum.

 

Thousands of people were employed in those silk mills, under deplorable conditions. 

 

Long hours doing difficult and back-breaking work was the norm. Pietro and Maria Botto, immigrants from northern Italy, were two of those workers. 

 

So was their daughter.

Pietro and Maria Botto house in Haledon, New Jersey. Home of the American Labor Museum.

In 1913, the workers decided to go on strike. 

 

Over 25,000 of them walked out, shutting down the silk industry. 

 

They wanted an eight-hour day, among other demands. 


Pietro and Maria Botto House in Haledon, New Jersey

 

The workers were forbidden to strike in Paterson, so they moved over the town line to neighboring Haledon. 

 

Pietro and Maria had a modest house in Haledon, but the front balcony was perfect for giving speeches. At the time, there was much free space and lawns for large crowds to gather in front of the house. 

 

Soon labor leaders from around the country descended upon this home. Upton Sinclair, the author of The Jungle, a famous and muckraking novel of conditions in factories and mills, was one of the speakers. 

 

The Industrial Workers of the World (I.W.W.), better known as the “Wobblies”, also were there. They were considered the “outside agitators” of the strike. 

 

This is a wonderful and succinct video of the strikes: 

 

 

The Botto house is now an official National Historic Landmark and the American Labor Museum is located there.

  sign

Pietro and Maria Botto
bedroom
The Dining Room
kitchen
kitchen

 

More About the American Labor Movement

 To see how the other half lived, you can check out my photos from 2014:  Lambert Castle Parts 1 and 2  

To read more about the silk strikes of 1913: Paterson Silk Strikes of 1913

If you are interested in reading books about labor, please read my reviews of Nickel and Dimed: On Not Getting By in America by Barbara Ehrenreich, and Punching In: The Unauthorized Adventures of a Front-Line Employee by Alex Frankel.  

 

Thanks for visiting New Jersey Memories!

American Labor Museum and the Pietro and Maria Botto House | Haledon, New Jersey

January 14, 2022

September 09, 2019

Ten Years!

floating hearts

 

Ten years ago today I started this blog. Happy Anniversary to me! 

So much has happened in those ten years. I got married. My mother died. I have become a fierce political activist because the current political situation is untenable. Not just in the United States, but the entire world.

I have recently been going through very old posts and WOW it is very clear that I didn’t have a clue about blogging or photography! I used to keep these posts up because I wanted to see how far I’d come but not anymore. I am embarrassed by them. 

So I have been deleting old posts with the worst photography and also the kind of posts that say: “I’ve been too busy to post but I’ll be back soon!” when in reality I was just too lazy to post! 

So many of the original photos have been ruined by the Great Photobucket Purge. They were originally removed by Photobucket, but then suddenly added back by Photobucket with huge, ugly watermarks on them. 

So I am still very slowly replacing some of the better ones. However, I have deleted over FIFTY posts! I can’t be bothered to replace the old watermarked posts with really bad photography anyway. However, I HAVE made PDFs of them with FireShot and also put the PDFs on flash drives. Now I can shudder over them in private.

So even though I did plan to stop posting here, I am fixing old posts, deleting some, and will update some others and post those HERE. 

I also have bunches of photographs that I have never posted and those will eventully be posted on my current blog, The Literary Lioness

Stay tuned!

Ten Years!

September 09, 2019

March 23, 2015

Wolves in New Jersey! The Lakota Wolf Preserve in Columbia

Wolf


The Lakota Wolf Preserve in Columbia, New Jersey is a special place. 

 

Wolves that were born in captivity are able to live out their lives in the beautiful outdoors. 


There are also bobcats and foxes at Lakota. Wolves, and bobcats, and foxes, oh my! 

The couple who run Lakota are dedicated to their animals and have run the preserve for over 15 years. They take wonderful care of their animals and truly love them. They have been committed to educating the public about wolves. 

I’ve been there, and I can see how much they love their animals! 

The public can take wolf-watching tours – don’t worry, the wolves are behind fences. They will also howl on cue! 


 

The surroundings are beautiful. 

 

Columbia is actually part of Knowlton Township, in the Kittatinny Valley


I took these photos last October. Sadly, this winter has been a struggle for the preserve because of the terrible weather and other unexpected issues. Sometimes the preserve has been closed for weeks.
 

If you'd like to help, you can sponsor a wolf

 

There are other ways to help out, too

 

Check out their website and Facebook page, too, for some gorgeous photographs and more information! 

There is a wonderfully detailed description of how the wolf preserve got started here, and links to websites containing professional photos of the wolves! 


Lakota Wolf Preserve
Camp Taylor Campground
Wolf
Wolf
/>
Fox
Fox


 

Thanks for visiting New Jersey Memories! 

Wolves in New Jersey! The Lakota Wolf Preserve in Columbia

March 23, 2015

June 22, 2014

The Brainy Borough: Metuchen

Metuchen Post Office, New Jersey
Metuchen, NJ Post Office, Brainy Boro Station

 

As I wrote in my post about the Lake Hiawatha Firehouse, many New Jersey town names are derived from Native American words. 

For example, the very nice borough (sometimes spelled "boro") of Metuchen is named for the Indian chief Metuching.

Metuchen is located in Middlesex County, completely surrounded by the much larger Edison Township, like a hole in a doughnut.

Just about 100 years ago, Metuchen had many intellectuals living and working in the town. The prosperous community of Glen Ridge had many intellectuals of their own and they decided that they were obviously a smarter town and they would claim bragging rights to the title. 

Metuchen responded to the challenge, and had a contest with Glen Ridge to decide which was the “brainy boro.” Metuchen won, and the name has stuck. Metuchen has never forgotten this, and has been bragging about this for the last century. 

To prove this, here are some links: 

 

Metuchen: The Brainy Borough's 'Overnight' Success 


Metuchen Living: People Events and Places in the Brainy Boro: Co-Working in the Brainy Boro 


Recently, there was a vaguely worried article on NJ.com about Metuchen’s downtown area, although the author assured readers that “plenty of people have moved to the Brainy Borough because they liked its vibrant, walkable downtown." 

Not to worry. Not only is the official motto of the town “The Official Brainy Borough” but one of the two post office branches is still called the “Brainy Boro Station.”

Metuchen Post Office, New Jersey
Brainy Boro Station, Metuchen, NJ Post Office
 

  Thanks for visiting New Jersey Memories!

The Brainy Borough: Metuchen

June 22, 2014

September 11, 2012

Dey Mansion, Wayne, New Jersey

Dey Mansion, Wayne, New Jersey

The Dey Mansion in Wayne, New Jersey, was the temporary headquarters for George Washington during the Revolutionary War. 

Dey Mansion is now part of the Passaic County Park System

Dey Mansion, Wayne, New Jersey

September 11, 2012

August 28, 2012

Fort Hancock at Sandy Hook

Fort Hancock
Fort Hancock in Sandy Hook was a military fort which operated from 1895 until 1974. The fort played an important part in defending New York harbor and New Jersey, especially during World War II and the Cold War.

The fort is on the Sandy Hook Bay side of the barrier spit of Sandy Hook, surrounding the iconic Sandy Hook Lighthouse.

Fort Hancock at Sandy Hook

The next photo is the chapel:

Fort Hancock at Sandy Hook chapel

The former movie theater, which is now a theater for stage shows:

Fort Hancock at Sandy Hook theater

Officers' quarters:

Fort Hancock at Sandy Hook Officers' quarters
Fort Hancock at Sandy Hook

History House, a restored house on Officer Row:

History House at Fort Hancock at Sandy Hook

The Mortar Battery:

The Mortar Battery
The Battery Potter, the nation's first disappearing gun battery:

The Battery Potter


To read more about Fort Hancock, read more here.

To see my other post about Sandy Hook, click here

To read about the Nike Missile base history of Fort Hancock, read here

 

Thanks for visiting New Jersey Memories!

Fort Hancock at Sandy Hook

August 28, 2012

August 21, 2012

Sandy Hook Lighthouse

lighthouse

Sandy Hook is at the very beginning of the New Jersey shore. 
 
It is a barrier spit extending out into the Atlantic Ocean. 
 
On one side is Sandy Hook Bay, and on the other side is the Atlantic Ocean. 
 
New York City is visible in the distance.

Sandy Hook Lighthouse is the oldest operating lighthouse in the United States. It was first lighted in 1764.

Sign

The lighthouse was outfitted with a Fresnel lens in the 1800’s.

Fresnel lens
Fresnel Lens
Fresnel Lens

There are splendid views in every direction from the top of the lighthouse. 
 
On one side is Fort Hancock, a former United States Army Fort which was decommissioned in 1974. 

View from Lighthouse

You can see the row of officers' houses in the background. 

Behind them is Sandy Hook Bay. 

View from lighthouse
View from Lighthouse


On the Atlantic Ocean side you can see New York City in the distance. 
 
That’s Brooklyn in the forefront and the towers of the famous Manhattan skyline in the background. 

You can see the currently-in-construction “Freedom Tower” (replacing the World Trade Center) rising above the rest, and The Empire State Building in the middle. 

View of New York City

For fascinating stories about the Sandy Hook Lighthouse, read here and here.
 

Thanks for visiting New Jersey Memories!

Sandy Hook Lighthouse

August 21, 2012

July 24, 2012

Wildwood Days

The Wildwoods

The Wildwoods in New Jersey are several beach towns by the Jersey Shore. The Wildwoods are considered to have the best beaches in New Jersey and some of the best beaches in the entire United States. 
 
There are several Wildwoods: Wildwood, North Wildwood, and Wildwood Crest. 
 
Wildwood is celebrating its 100th Anniversary this year! 

The Wildwoods are nothing like nearby Cape May. They have amusement parks, doo-wop architecture and are family oriented. You can eat some frozen custard, deep-fried Oreos, and of course seafood. 
 
Bobby Rydell sang a song about the place:
 

 
 
 
And it is true that the beaches are magnificent and enormous! 


The Wildwood Boardwalk is also famous, and is home to many eating establishments and nearby several amusement parks.
 
The Wildwood Boardwalk
Custard stand
Doo-Wop Diner
Doo-Wop Diner

The boardwalk is so long that there are tram cars that take you back and forth. The cry of “Watch the tram car, please! Watch the tram car, please!” will follow you down the boardwalk! 

tram cars
tram cars
Wildwood, New Jersey

For more about the Wildwoods, read here


For more about the Wildwood boardwalk, read here.  
 
Thanks for visiting New Jersey Memories!


Wildwood Days

July 24, 2012

July 17, 2012

Visiting Cape May

Cape May Stage


The downtown area of Cape May, New Jersey is charming. It is a very busy beach resort town, and the beach is great – but so are strolling around, eating and shopping! 

 

To get to Cape May, you get off at Exit 0 on the Garden State Parkway! 

Exit 0

You can take bike around town, take trolley rides, and also take a horse-and-carriage ride.
Horse-and-Carriage rides
Horse-and-Carriage rides, Cape May, New Jersey
Cape May sign
Cape May fountain

Below is Our Lady Star of the Sea Church, founded in 1911. 

Our Lady Star of the Sea Church, Cape May, New Jersey


The Towne Crier: 

Welcome Friends Old and New, Linger Here A Day Or Two


The Towne Crier

Cape May had a long history as a whaling town:

 

Dedicated to our fishermen lost at sea


Dedicated to our fishermen lost at sea


I was thrilled see the Dala Horse sign indicating a shop filled with lovely Swedish items. 

 

My mother was born in Sweden, and I grew up with beautiful Swedish items in my home. 

Swede Things shop, Cape May, New Jersey

There are some other lovely places to browse:

Gallery D'May Fine Art
Uncle Charley's Ice Cream
Fralinger's Salt Water Taffy


After a hard day of shopping, take time to go to the beach! 

 

Make sure you take a Cape May umbrella

Cape May beach

Places mentioned in this post:

Cape May Stage

Cape May Carriage Co. 

Our Lady Star of the Sea Church

Swede Things in America

Gallery D'May Fine Art

Uncle Charley's Ice Cream

Fralinger's Salt Water Taffy
 

This week I want to give a shout out to Mark of the Cape May Blog. He was nice enough to mention my photos on his blog! Check out his blog, too! 

I also want to thank The SITS Girls for mentioning my blog on their Saturday ShareFest! 

Please check out all of my Cape May posts! You can see the painted ladies of Cape May, the Cape May lighthouse in Cape May Point, and how patriotic Cape May is!

 

Thanks for visiting New Jersey Memories!


Visiting Cape May

July 17, 2012